Informative Speech Instructions

Informative Speech Instructions
Description
For this speech, you will be providing a 5-7 minute speech/presentation on a topic
that provides relatively NEW information to your audience. Informative speeches
should be interesting, fun and factual. You should discuss
the who, what, where, when, and how. It is important to note that you should NOT
in any way provide your opinion on the subject matter. Informative speeches are
meant to present NEW information to your audience. So, you may think of
yourself as “teacher for a day.”
Requirements

  1. Formal Outline: You will be required to turn in a full-sentence outline
    complete with in-text citations and a works cited page on the day of your
    speech.
  2. Sources: Minimum of 3 (three) orally cited sources from at least 2 types
    of research with 1 being a journal article from CPP library portal. This
    means that if you cite all web sites, you do not meet the assignment
    requirements. For example: 1 newspaper article, 1 peer reviewed or industry
    specific journal article, and 1 pamphlet OR 1 government (.gov) or university
    (.edu) web site article, 1.book.
    a. Sources must be heard during the speech
    b. Cited in the text of the outline (called in-text citation)
    c. Work Cited page
    Informative speech outline
    INTRODUCTION (All capital letters)
    I.Attention Getter: This represents the first words out of your mouth! So make
    sure it GRABS the audience in. Make sure it is relevant/appropriate to your
    topic. Some devices you can use for the attention getter are:
    • Joke/Humor (Make sure it is appropriate/in good taste!)
    • Narrative/Story (Be brief)
    • Shocking Statement
    • Fact/Statistic
    • Poem
    • Quote
    • Question
    • Visual Aid/Activity
    I.Specific Purpose Statement: Today, I will inform you…
    II.Significance/ Relevance to the audience: This statement should let the
    audience know why it is relevant and/or important to them.
    III.Credibility: If you have a particular credibility with a topic (i.e. if you are a
    member, work at, or have used the services) then reveal this and your
    research on the topic in a credibility statement. This will help create trust
    between you and your audience and demonstrate that you know what you are
    discussing.
    IV.Preview Statement: This statement should reveal ALL of your main points in
    one simple sentence and give the audience a clear picture of what is to come
    in your speech. Another option is to use three sentences with parallel words
    (i.e. first, second, third) to be simple and concise and allow the audience to
    hear how many points they will hear within your speech.
    MAJOR TRANSITION: This statement allows the audience to hear that you are
    moving from the introduction to the body and can be relatively brief. “Now that we
    know what we are going to discuss, let us first look at….”
    BODY (All capital letters)
    I.Main Point: Provide a general opening sentence which previews information and
    evidence to come in the sub-points below. (Note: Keep sub-points in pairs at minimum). A. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support. (Note: keep sentences simple and
    make sure the information is in clear
    “groupings”).
    B. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides
    more specific information and may include evidence
    to support.
    i. Related to the first sub-point,
    but again, provides even more
    detailed information/evidence.
    C. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides
    more specific information and may include evidence
    to support.
    i. Related to the first sub-point,
    but again, provides even more
    detailed information/evidence.
    Minor Transition: This sentence shows movement from point A to point B.
    I.Main Point: Provide a general opening sentence which previews information and
    evidence to come in the sub-points below. (Note: Keep sub-points in pairs at minimum). A. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support. (Note: keep sentences simple and
    make sure the information is in clear
    “groupings”).
    B. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides
    more specific information and may include evidence
    to support.
    i. Related to the first sub-point,
    but again, provides even more
    detailed information/evidence.
    C. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides
    more specific information and may include evidence
    to support.
    i. Related to the first sub-point,
    but again, provides even more
    detailed information/evidence.
    Minor Transition: This sentence shows movement from point B to point C.
    I.Main Point: Provide a general opening sentence which previews information and
    evidence to come in the sub-points below. (Note: Keep sub-points in pairs at minimum). A. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support. (Note: keep sentences simple and
    make sure the information is in clear
    “groupings”).
    B. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides
    more specific information and may include evidence
    to support.
    i. Related to the first sub-point,
    but again, provides even more
    detailed information/evidence.
    C. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides
    more specific information and may include evidence
    to support.
    i. Related to the first sub-point,
    but again, provides even more
    detailed information/evidence.
    MAJOR TRANSITION: This sentence should move the audience from your
    body into your conclusion.
    CONCLUSION (All capital letters)
    I. Review Statement: This statement should reiterate
    your points again to summarize what your audience learned about in your
    speech. Make sure to include all of your main points. This should be the
    mirror image of your preview statement but written/spoken in past tense,
    “Today we have learned about…”
    II. Final Thought: This sentence(s) leave your audience
    with a great last impression of you and your speech/information. Like the
    attention getter, you can use devices such as a quote, question, story,
    joke, etc. to create a lasting memory. Better yet! Tie it to your attention
    getter.
    WORKS CITED
    Your works cited should represent ONLY the information/evidence you use
    within your speech as opposed to all of the information you
    researched. Make sure to put citations in MLA or APA format and list
    in alphabetical order according to last name of the authors.
    Any source that is in your Works Cited page must have a match in the text.

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